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  Scope of Services
 
StevedoringStevedoring means all work performed (On Board Vessel.) It is the process of loading and unloading cargoes, stowing hatches, compartments and on deck or open cargo space on board vessel. (The services related to stevedoring are re-rigging ship’s gear.)
ArrastreArrastre means all work performed (On Dock.) It is the process of receiving and loading cargoes from and on to ship’s tackle, providing mechanical equipment for receiving, stowing, transporting, shifting, sorting and piling of cargoes for temporary storage within the port area.
Other Related ServicesOther related services include: Making fast and letting go of vessels, shifting cargoes during vessel operation, opening and closing hatches, stripping and stuffing of containerized cargoes, bagging of bulk cargoes, and providing labourers for “extra jobs” or special request by the client that are not related to stevedoring and arrastre services.
ProductivityProductivity refers to the efficiency of the operational “gang” in producing and handling of cargoes over a certain period of time (hour, day.) Productivity rate is normally express in metric tons when handling non-containerized cargoes, and in boxes when handling containerized cargoes. Productivity rate on non-containerized cargoes vary according to type of commodities handled and the type of vessel’s gear serviced, the same with containerized cargoes.
Productivity rate is computed at net gang hours, that is any standby hours caused by rain, vessel gears’ mechanical trouble, and other factors not attributable to the cargo handler, would be deducted from gross operating hours. For purposes of determining the productivity rate on a per day basis, TEFASCO assumes a “maximum operating hours” per day, per gang, exclusive of any standby hours.
For the detailed activities on stevedoring and arrastre services, and the productivity rates per type of cargo and vessel, please see the following exhibits:
  Stevedoring - Non-Containerized Cargo – (Shipside Operations)
 
 
Re-rigging - Planning, preparing, and arranging the ship’s gears in order to start the unloading/loading operation.
Snatching and Centering - Snatching of cargo to be unloaded and bringing it to the center portion of the vessel’s hatch, ready for unloading.
Equipment on Board - Using of equipment (e.g. forklift) in the centering of cargoes stowed at the inner portion of the vessel’s hold.
Unloading from the First Vessel - Discharging of cargoes from the first vessel using appropriate equipment.
Loading into Second Vessel - Loading of cargoes into the second vessel using ship’s gear and other appropriate equipment.
Checking - Inspecting and annotating the condition of cargoes unloaded or loaded from or to the vessel tallying the volume of cargoes handled.
  Stevedoring – Non-Containerized Cargo – (Quayside Operations)
 
 
Re-rigging - Planning, preparing, and arranging the ship’s gears in order to start the unloading/loading operation.
Snatching and Centering - Snatching of cargo to be unloaded and bringing it to the center portion of the vessel’s hatch, ready for unloading.
Equipment on Board - Using of equipment (e.g. forklift) in the centering of cargoes stowed at the inner portion of the vessel’s hold.
Unloading - Discharging of cargoes from the vessel using appropriate equipment.
Loading - Loading of cargoes into the vessel using ship’s gear and other appropriate equipment.
Checking - Inspecting and annotating the condition of cargoes unloaded or loaded from or to the vessel tallying the volume of cargoes handled.
  Stevedoring – Containerized Cargo
 
 
Disengaging of Twist Locks - Disengaging of twist locks of stocking cones in order to move the container for unloading.
Unloading - Discharging of containers from the vessel’s deck using the ship’s crane.
UNDER THE DECK Disengaging of Twist Locks - Disengaging of twist locks of stocking cones in order to move the container for unloading.
Unloading - Discharging of containers from the vessel’s deck using the ship’s crane.
Loading - Loading of cargoes into the vessel using ship’s crane.
Checking - Inspecting and annotating the condition of containers unloaded or loaded from or to the vessel tallying the volume of containers handled.

  Arrastre – Non-Containerized Cargo
 
 
Unloading Receiving - Receiving of unloaded cargoes at quayside.
Hustling - Transporting of the unloaded cargoes from quayside to yard or Container Freight Station (CFS) or any designated areas of storage.
Checking - Inspecting and annotating the condition of cargoes unloaded from the vessel and tallying the volume of cargoes handled.
Sorting and Piling - Sorting, piling, and classifying of cargoes in the designated areas, including recouping bad orders and damaged cargoes.
Securing - Securing of cargoes from pilferage and losses while under custody.
Releasing - Releasing of cargoes to consignees upon clearance from Customs and payment of arrastre and other related fees.
Loading Receiving - Accepting of cargoes at yard or CFS awaiting vessel’s arrival.
Hustling - Transporting of cargoes from the yard or CFS to quayside for loading to the vessel.
Loading - Loading of cargoes into the vessel using ship’s gear and other appropriate equipment.
Checking - Inspecting and tallying the volume of cargoes loaded.

  Arrastre – Containerized Cargo
 
 
Unloading Receiving - Receiving unloaded containers unto trailer/chassis.
Checking - Inspecting and annotating the condition of containers received from the vessel and tallying volume of containers handled.
Hustling - Transporting of the unloaded containers from quayside to the designated container yard within the port area.
Stacking and Piling - Stacking and piling of containers at the designated container yard using the RTGs (transtainers) within the port area.
Securing - Securing of containers from pilferage and losses while under custody.
Releasing - Releasing of containers to consignees upon clearance from Customs and payment of arrastre and other related fees.
Loading Receiving - Accepting of containers at the yard awaiting vessel’s arrival.
Hustling - Transporting of containers from the yard within the port area to quayside for loading to the vessel.
Loading - Loading of containers into the vessel using the ship’s crane.
Checking - Inspecting and tallying the volume of containers loaded.

  Other Related Services
 
 
Making fast and letting go - Engaging and disengaging of ships line to/from the port bollard upon docking and departure of vessel.
Opening and Closing of Hatches - First opening and last closing of hatches is the vessel’s responsibility. Opening and closing of McGregor hatch cover is always done by vessel’s crew.
Shifting of Cargoes - Transferring of cargoes from vessel to vessel and vessel to dock, dock to vessel, to-hatch, and bay-to-bay (must be covered by written request from vessel.)
Stripping - Putting out or retrieving of cargoes from containers.
Stuffing - Putting in or piling of cargoes into container.
Bagging - Placing of bulk cargoes into prescribed sacks or bags.
Shoring - Bracing of cargoes using carpentry and other tools to reinforce safety on cargoes.
Equipment Rental - Leasing of equipment to outside parties for certain activities not related to stevedoring or arrastre services.
Extra Labour Charges - Using of labor force by outside parties for special works that are not related to stevedoring and arrastre services.

  Productivity – Per Net Gang Hour
 
 
Vessel with Low Productivity Rate (obsolete ship gears, very low lifting capacity, very slow boom cycle, with cargo stowage)
Vessel with Medium Productivity Rate (fast boom cycle but limited lifting capacity)
Vessel with High Productivity Rate (excellent ship gears, very high lifting capacity, very fast boom cycle, and no problems with cargo stowage)
Productivity rates on non-containerized cargoes vary according to the following factors:
Vessel’s configuration (hatch opening, crane/boom safe working load, crane cycle)
Ship’s gear condition
Cargo Stowage
Productivity rate on containerized cargo is based primarily on the vessel’s crane performance.
Vessel’s operation is assumed to be at “maximum 20 hour” per day, under normal conditions.
Vessel’s operation hours exclude any “standby hours” caused by rain, vessel mechanical trouble, non-availability of consignees’ trucks, and other factors not attributable to the cargo handler. The said standby hours would be deducted from vessel operation hours to arrive at the net gang hours in computing the productivity rate for the day.
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